Archive for the ‘Inspiration’ Category

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Nikon’s PR Disaster – RESPONSE

September 29, 2011

After the misstep of posting the following  on their Facebook Page:

“A Photographer is only as good as the equipment he uses.” 

Nikon has issued the following reponse:

“We know some of you took offense to the last post, and we apologize, as it was not our aim to insult any of our friends. Our statement was meant to be interpreted that the right equipment can help you capture amazing images. We appreciate the passion you have for photography and your gear, and know that a great picture is possible anytime and anywhere.”

We all got a good chuckle out of this.  It was so obviously just poor choice of words and not a legitimate sentiment by the camera giant.  Forgive and forget… I’ll let the love affair with my two Nikons and various Nikkor lenses continue now.

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Nikon’s Huge Public Relations Error…

September 28, 2011

Nikon published a post on their Facebook Page stating:

 

 

“A Photographer is only as good as the equipment he uses.” 

 

 

Now, I understand the sentiment of this, but when you actually stop and read it, it can be taken as:

1) You can’t shoot good photos, unless you have [our] “good” gear.  

Or even more scandalous…

2) Your “good” photos, are a a result of our “good” gear 

… thus totally discounting your skill and hardwork in the process. 

This is more humorous to me than offensive.  But really… just a wonderful example of why it’s important to have the PR team run the post by someone before it goes live.

How much enjoyment do you think the folks over at Canon are getting out of this.  🙂

 

 

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Nikon's Huge Public Relations Error…

September 28, 2011

Nikon published a post on their Facebook Page stating:

 

 

“A Photographer is only as good as the equipment he uses.” 

 

 

Now, I understand the sentiment of this, but when you actually stop and read it, it can be taken as:

1) You can’t shoot good photos, unless you have [our] “good” gear.  

Or even more scandalous…

2) Your “good” photos, are a a result of our “good” gear 

… thus totally discounting your skill and hardwork in the process. 

This is more humorous to me than offensive.  But really… just a wonderful example of why it’s important to have the PR team run the post by someone before it goes live.

How much enjoyment do you think the folks over at Canon are getting out of this.  🙂

 

 

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Capturing Solitude: The Music of Shooting

September 26, 2011

It dawned on me that while I’m very open with the steps of my shooting, editing, socialization and marketing… I haven’t ever focused on what, to me, is one of the most important elements of making a good photograph:

What I’m listening to while I shoot and process.

Depending on the type of shoot and number of people involved, I will often have music going, either on speakers or in headphones.  And never will I process without music.  This is so vital in setting the tone and mood of the pieces I’m working on.  When I set out to shoot (I’m speaking here of more creative, personal jobs — not portrait sessions where the client dictates much of what we’re going for) I tend to already know what I’m feeling, what I’m looking for, and what I hope to capture.  Keeping a constant flow of music that fits with the mood goes a long way towards helping me find what I want.

I’ve posted a couple images from a solo shoot I went on a few days back — HERE and HERE.  I knew heading up that there was something I was needing to find… and not find.  There are days when I set out to shoot people, and life and action.  This was not one of those days.  This was a day of setting out to find nothing but a feeling of solitude.  It was late afternoon, and the sun was setting and I drove up into the mountains north of Los Angeles.  It was chilly, dropping into the mid 40’s and a steady rain was falling  (it was 95 degrees and sunny at my house when I left).  I took a 16 mile long and winding road up the side of a mountain in Los Padres National Forest and when I was nearly at the top, I found an unmarked dirt road.  I took it and went a mile in before realizing I had no idea where I was, or if I was going to be able to turn around or God forbid, back the whole way out.  So… I stopped and got out on foot.  I adjusted my lenses under a canopy of trees, taking a test shot here of my trusty Tundra.

I wandered up and down in the hills for an hour and a half until light started to become scarce.  The whole while I had music playing on a small speaker phone so I could also hear the sounds of the rain around me.  Just a great mood, relaxing yet rejuvenating.  I stumbled onto the Original Score from “The Assassination of Jesse James” some weeks before (by Nick Cave and Warren Ellis) and it was the perfect walking partner.

I then listened to it while I imported and processed the shots from the day.  As I look at the finished products, I feel the warmth and loneliness from the music.

Such an important part of the process.

Here’s one of my favorite tracks from the album:

 

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Quote: Sam Haskins

September 2, 2011
Sam Haskins

A photographer went to a socialite party in New York. As he entered the front door, the host said ‘I love your pictures – they’re wonderful; you must have a fantastic camera.’ He said nothing until dinner was finished, then: ‘That was a wonderful dinner; you must have a terrific stove.’ – Sam Haskins